Grammys: Artists Pay Tribute to Tom Petty, Chuck Berry, Fats Domino and More

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Meanwhile, Brothers Osborne, Eric Church and Maren Morris dedicated a cover of Eric Clapton’s “Tears in Heaven” to the victims of a mass shooting at a country music concert in Las Vegas last October.

At a Grammys night heavy with tributes, country performers Brothers Osborne, Eric Church and Maren Morris dedicated a cover of Eric Clapton’s “Tears in Heaven” (1992) to the victims of a mass shooting at a country music concert in Las Vegas last October as well as the victims of the bombing at the Ariana Grande concert in Manchester, England, in May.

Morris urged viewers not to forget “the beautiful, music-loving souls so cruelly taken from us" at the Route 91 festival in Vegas. In total, 58 people died and 481 were wounded. 

The specter of those recently lost remained present throughout the night. Chris Stapleton and Emmylou Harris gave an emotional rendition of “Wildflowers” by Tom Petty, the lead singer of Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers, who died in October.

Flanked by screens featuring images of moving flowers, Stapleton and Harris sang through the beginning of the "In Memoriam" tribute, which honored musicians like Chester Bennington, Chris Cornell and Dolores O'Riordan and others such as Jerry Lewis.

Other noteworthy tributes included rock 'n' roll heavy performances of Fats Domino’s “Ain’t That a Shame” (1955) and Chuck Berry's “Maybellene” (1955) from singers Jon Baptiste, Gary Clark Jr. and Joe Saylor. Both Domino and Berry, legends who pioneered the rock-and-roll genre in the 1950s, died last year.

Ben Platt, the former star of the Tony-winning musical Dear Evan Hansen, sang “Somewhere” from West Side Story in honor of songwriter Leonard Bernstein. Grammy and Tony winner Patti LuPone followed up Platt’s performance with an emotional reprisal of Evita's “Don’t Cry for Me Argentina,” which she'd performed at the 1981 Grammys. 

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