Amazon Secures Champions League Rights for Germany

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The agreement follows a high-profile deal for Premier League rights in the U.K.

Amazon has signed another major deal for sports rights in Europe, securing the rights to select matches in the UEFA Champions League for the German market, Amazon confirmed Tuesday.

The agreement, which was first reported on German media trade website dwdl.de, follows Amazon's high-profile deal for Premier League soccer matches in the U.K.

Under the new pact, Amazon will get “first pick” of Tuesday evening Champions League matches for the 2021-2022 season. Champions League rights are now typically divided up among multiple providers. Games for the current season in Germany are split between pay-TV provider Sky, Deutsche Telekom and sports streaming service DAZN.

"We're excited to bring UEFA Champions League football to our customers in Germany," Alex Green, managing director, Prime Video Sport Europe, said in a statement. “The UEFA Champions League is one of the most prestigious club competitions in the world. We’re delighted to bring the top-pick Tuesday matches to our customers from 2021.”

Amazon and UEFA did not provide financial details of the deal, but Germany is Amazon Prime's second-biggest market and the company clearly sees soccer as a way to boost subscription numbers.

Amazon first dipped its toe into sports rights in Germany in 2017, picking up audio rights for the local Bundesliga matches. Its most high-profile sports venture in Europe to date is for England's Premier League, where Amazon has bought the rights to 20 matches per season from 2019-22, marking the first time a live English Premier League game will not be available on linear television in the U.K.

In the U.S., Amazon carried the NFL's Thursday Night Football as well as the U.S. Open tennis tournament.

At the TCA press tour in February, Albert Cheng, co-head of TV at Amazon Studios, said the streamer was “dipping its toe in the water” of live sports rights. “We obviously in it and experimenting and we’re trying to understand how our customers are responding to it,” he said.