Arnold Kopelson’s Beverly Hills Home Hits the Market

Hilton and Hyland; Jeffrey Mayer/WireImage

The late ‘Platoon’ producer’s Mediterranean-style four-bedroom is listed for $13.5 million.

The Beverly Hills home of the late Oscar-winning producer Arnold Kopelson, who was behind such features as Platoon, Seven and The Fugitive, has just been listed. The Roxbury Drive property, which Kopelson and his wife, Anne, called home for decades is on the market for $13.5 million. 

Originally built in 1935, the four-bedroom, seven-bathroom Mediterranean-style gated home sits on a lot that is a little more than half an acre. The main two-story house is 9,700 square feet has a signature rooftop turret. Classic moldings dot the interior as does a wrap-around staircase in the foyer along with a domed ceiling. There are several rooms for socializing, including a living room with coffered ceilings and a fireplace, all of which adjoins a library. Additionally, there is a large formal dining room and an entertainment lounge. The upstairs offers four bedrooms, including a 2,500-square-foot master suite with walk-in closets. Outside there is an expansive backyard with a Roman frieze built into the exterior wall, to go with several sculptures, a spa and a pool.

“It's an absolute stunning piece of architecture and is one of the most beautiful examples of California Mediterranean style,” said Hilton & Hyland’s Linda May who has the listing. May added that a virtual who’s who of Hollywood — Morgan Freeman, Sidney Poitier, Sean Connery and Jackie Collins, to name but a few — were guests of the Kopelsons over the years for some of their legendary dinner parties that typically ended with the screening of a film. “The house has these beautiful public rooms and the library and dining rooms are really lovely. The house was always a fabulous house for entertaining and for raising a family.”

Kopelson, who died at the age of 83 in October, produced nearly 30 features, including Triumph of the Spirit (1989), Falling Down (1993), Outbreak (1995), Eraser (1996), The Devil's Advocate (1997), the sequel U.S. Marshals (1998), A Perfect Murder (1998), Thieves (2001) and Twisted (2004).