'Avengers: Endgame' Midnight Audience Potentially Exposed to Measles

The Orange County Health Care Agency (HCA) confirmed its first case of measles in 2019, from a 20-something resident of Placentia who reported recent international travel to one of the countries experiencing a widespread outbreak.

An audience attending a midnight showing of Avengers: Endgame last week may have been exposed to measles, health officials said Wednesday.

The Orange County Health Care Agency (HCA) confirmed its first case of measles in 2019, from a 20-something resident of Placentia, who reported recent international travel to one of the countries experiencing a widespread outbreak.

The Placentia resident attended a midnight showing of Endgame on April 25 at the AMC Movie Theater at 1001 S. Lemon St. in Fullerton. Guests who were at the theater from 11 p.m. until 4 a.m. may have been exposed to the virus, the HCA warned. The health department posted a notice at the location. 

The individual was considered infectious between April 23 to May 1 and is currently under voluntary isolation at home. 

"Measles is a highly contagious and potentially severe disease that causes fever, rash, cough and red, watery eyes," said Orange County interim health officer Dr. Nichole Quick in a statement. "The MMR vaccine is a simple, inexpensive and very effective measure to prevent the spread of this serious virus."

Other potential exposure locations are 5 Hutton Centre Dr., Santa Ana, April 23-25 from 7:45 a.m. to 7:15 p.m. and St. Jude Emergency Department, 101 E. Valencia Mesa Dr. in Fullerton, on April 27 from 7-9 a.m., according to HCA officials.

Health officials have been working with the facilities, trying to contact people who may have been exposed and who are now at increased risk of severe outcomes, such as infants, pregnant women and those with compromised immune systems.

So far in 2019, 38 people have been infected with measles in California, state health officials recently announced. Of those cases, 14 were international travelers. Twenty-two cases were spread from travelers to others in California, and two cases are of unknown origins.

"Vaccination is the only way to ensure you and your family members will not get measles," state public health officer and CDPH director Dr. Karen Smith said. "Many countries are currently experiencing widespread measles activity. Make sure you and your family are fully vaccinated before traveling internationally, and contact your health care provider immediately if anyone develops a rash and a fever while you are abroad or when you return."