Berlin: Download THR's Day 1 Daily

The fest's first daily issue includes a look at how Sundance's spending spree could brighten up a chilly Berlinale, a Q&A with 'The Kindness of Strangers' helmer Lone Scherfig, and a conversation with departing festival head Dieter Kosslick.

The Hollywood Reporter has released its first Berlin International Film Festival daily issue, which features a look at how the hot Sundance buying spree could impact the European Film Market, a conversation with the writer-director of fest opener The Kindness of Strangers, and a chat with departing festival director Dieter Kosslick.

Sundance's Spending Impact

The tight turnaround this year between the Sundance Film Festival — which wrapped on Sunday — and Berlin, which kicks off Thursday — could actually turn into a positive for jet-lagged executives hopping from Utah to Germany if the Park City buying helps liven up Berlin’s European Film Market. THR takes a look at why that is.

"I Hope the Film Will Age Well"

After the success of Italian for Beginners and its follow-up, 2002’s dark comedy Wilbur Wants to Kill Himself, Lone Scherfig became somewhat of a go-to director for British rom-coms and literary adaptations — An Education, One Day, Riot Club and Their Finest — all written by other people. But for The Kindness of Strangers, which opens the 69th Berlin Festival on Feb. 7, Scherfig is again playing the auteur, directing from her own script a story of lonely people connecting under the bright lights of New York City. Scherfig opens up to THR about the genesis of the film, writing for an American setting and characters and what the movie "has to do with the present-day situation in the United States."

"It's Not Just a Place to Take Selfies"

It's been a long, strange ride for Dieter Kosslick. In his 18 years as head of the Berlin International Film Festival, the quirky Kosslick has danced with Bollywood legend Shah Rukh Khan, jammed with the Rolling Stones and, by inviting Fidel Castro to attend one year, nearly caused an international incident. (Fidel, sadly, didn't make it.) In that time, Kosslick has transformed Berlin into the world's largest public film festival with the world's second-largest film market — the EFM. "I have no regrets," he tells THR ahead of his final Berlin Festival. "In 18 years, I've achieved everything I wanted to at the Berlinale."

Click here to download the Day 1 PDF.