Box Office: 'Crawl,' 'Stuber' Crumble in Shadow of 'Spider-Man'

Courtesy of Hopper Stone/SMPSP/Twentieth Century Fox Film Corporation; Paramount Pictures.
'Stuber' (left), 'Crawl'

Not even the web-slinging hero could prevent another down weekend for mainstream fare, however. Elsewhere, 'The Farewell' shined at the specialty box office with the best location average of the year.

In another blow for the summer box office, newcomers Crawl and Stuber wilted in their box office debuts with an estimated $12 million and $8 million, respectively, a disappointing showing for major studio releases.

Sony and Marvel Studios' Spider-Man: Far From Home instead dominated in its second weekend as it reached $847.1 million globally. In North America, the pic took in $45.3 million from 4,634 theaters for a $274.6 million cume.

Overseas, Far From Home earned another $100 million for a foreign tally of $572.5 million — the biggest showing ever for the franchise, not adjusted for inflation. The previous best was 2007's Spider-Man 3 ($555 million).

Not even the web-slinging hero could prevent another down weekend in terms of overall ticket sales, however. Domestic revenue slipped more than 25 percent from the same weekend a year ago, putting year-to-date revenue down 8.7 percent, according to Comscore.

Disney and Pixar's Toy Story 4 also held strong at No. 2. Now in its fourth weekend, the animated tentpole grossed another $20.7 million domestically and $48.1 million overseas for a worldwide cume of $771.1 million.

The Disney empire also saw solid results for The Lion King in China, where the Jon Favreau-directed film opened to $54.1 million, ahead of fellow Disney titles The Jungle Book, Beauty and the Beast and, more recently, Aladdin.

Crawl and Stuber hoped to serve as counterprogramming to tentpole fare but failed to generate much interest after both earning a lackluster B CinemaScore.

Paramount's Crawl, which cost a modest $13.5 million to produce, certainly fared the best.

Directed by Alexandre Aja, the R-rated pic is a disaster thriller about a father (Barry Pepper) and daughter (Kaya Scodelario) who are pursued by an army of alligators when trapped inside their home during a Category 5 hurricane. (The film opened just as real-life Hurricane Barry struck land in Louisiana, where theaters were closed for part of the weekend in such locales as New Orleans and Baton Rouge.)

Crawl under-indexed on both coasts, while 60 percent of ticket buyers were between the ages of 18 and 34. Males made up 51 percent of the audience.

Michael Dowse's Stuber followed at No. 4. Disney inherited the '80s-style action-comedy upon acquiring the 20th Century Fox film empire in March (it is the first R-rated title released by Disney since The Fifth Estate in 2013).

Kumail Nanjiani and Dave Bautista star as mismatched heroes in the pic, which follows an Uber driver who unwillingly becomes part of a police officer's arrest operation.

Stuber played best in the West and Southwest. Males made up 56 percent of the audience, while 56 percent of ticket buyers were between 18 and 34.

Crawl's current score on Rotten Tomatoes stands at 88 percent; Stuber sits at a disappointing 45 percent.

Overseas, Crawl grossed $4.9 million from its first 20 markets for a global start of $16.8 million. Stuber earned $3.9 million from its first nine countries, including major markets such as the U.K. and Australia, for a global weekend tally of $11.9 million.

Universal and Working Title's Yesterday continued to please in its third weekend. The adult-skewing film rounded out the top five at the North American box office with $6.8 million for a domestic total of $48.3 million and a global cume of $80.5 million.

At the specialty box office, A24 and filmmaker Lulu Wang's The Farewell dazzled in its opening, earning $351,330 from four theaters for a location average of $87,833 — the best of the year so far and despite the fact that one of its theaters, the AMC Lincoln Center, was closed Saturday night due to a power outage in New York City.

The critically acclaimed dramedy stars Awkwafina as the daughter of Chinese immigrants who are forced to go along with the family's deception of her beloved grandmother back home. The Farewell boasts a rare 100 percent score on Rotten Tomatoes.

The Art of Self-Defense, the sophomore feature from writer-director Riley Stearns, opened in seven theaters, earning $121,080 for a location average of $17,292. Bleecker Street is distributing the film, which stars Jesse Eisenberg as a mugging victim who wants to learn karate.