Caroline Yim, Zach Iser Land at CAA After Getting Locked Out of ICM Offices

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Caroline Yim, Zach Iser

Both thought they had one more week to go on their contracts and were negotiating renewal deals as they fielded competing offers from Paradigm, CAA and UTA.

As Friday drew to a close, it seemed as though Caroline Yim and Zach Iser might have overplayed their hands at ICM Partners.

Both thought they had one more week to go on their contracts and were negotiating renewal deals as they fielded competing offers from Paradigm, CAA and UTA. As the day closed without Yim or Iser having reached a deal, ICM management surprised the pair and told them they were being locked out of their offices; one of their assistants was escorted out of the ICM Partners building. The time for negotiating was over — ICM was moving on.

The sudden termination, a week before their April 1 contract date, caused a brief panic for Iser and Yim, who had spent months trying to negotiate their exits, but by Monday afternoon, the pair had signed with CAA, expecting to bring a substantial portion of their rosters to the talent agency.

Iser will work in CAA's New York office, while Yim will work in the Los Angeles office. Together, the pair's ICM clients included SZA, Anderson .Paak, Future, Daniel Caesar, Migos, Rae Sremmurd, ScHoolboy Q and Kehlani, plus many others. At press time, it was unclear which artists would join them at CAA, which boasts its own expansive urban roster that includes Kanye West, A$AP Rocky, Cardi B, Logic, A Tribe Called Quest, Fetty Wap and acts including KYLE, Smino, Jorja Smith and GoldLink.

“Caroline and Zach have had incredible success in identifying and developing some of the greatest voices in the urban music scene,” Darryl Eaton, co-head of contemporary music at CAA, said Monday in a statement. “They are a terrific complement to our team and we are thrilled to welcome them.”

Multiple sources tell Billboard that compensation for the pair was the major sticking point slowing negotiations.

This article originally appeared on Billboard.com.