CMA Awards Get Political With "Before He Tweets" Parody Song

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Brad Paisley and Carrie Underwood

"And it's fun to watch, that's for sure, until little rocket man starts a nuclear war. And then maybe next time he'll think before he tweets," host Brad Paisley sung.

Hosts Brad Paisley and Carrie Underwood got political on Wednesday, despite the restrictions the Country Music Association had placed on eligible topics for the media (which they later walked back on and apologized for).

"Now Brad, I don't know if you've heard about this but the CMA has given us specific topics to avoid. This year is a politics-free zone," Underwood told her co-host in their opener.

Paisley proceeded to parody various songs, adding a political twist to them. "So we can't even do 'way down yonder on the Scaramooch?'" he asked, referring to ousted White House communications director Anthony Scaramucci in a riff on Alan Jackson's country hit, "Chattahoochee."

The bit took a turn when Paisley parodied his co-host's hit, "Before He Cheats." The country crooner turned it into "Before He Tweets," as an ode to President Trump, who famously spends a lot of time on Twitter

"Right now, he's probably in his PJs watching cable news, reaching for his cell phone," Paisley sung. "Right now he's probably asking Siri, 'How in the hell do you spell Pocahontas?' In the middle of the night, from the privacy of a gold toilet plated White House toilet seat, he writes, 'Little Bob Corker, NFL and covfefe.' And it's fun to watch, that's for sure, until little rocket man starts a nuclear war. And then maybe next time he'll think before he tweets." He was referring to North Korean leader Kim Jong-un, whom Trump has tauntingly referred to as "Little Rocket Man."

The Country Music Association had apologized after trying to impose restrictions on any questions by the media about the mass shooting in Las Vegas, gun rights or political affiliations at its awards show. A statement from the CMA last Friday said the restrictions on topics in their media guidelines were lifted, which came following a backlash by artists, including from the co-host for the awards show, Paisley.

Paisley tweeted that the restrictions were "ridiculous and unfair" and called on the CMA to rescind them. Two hours later, CMA apologized, but said, "The sentiment was not to infringe and was created with the best of intentions to honor and celebrate country music."

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