'Downton Abbey' Castle Lists on Airbnb

Jaap Buitendijk/Focus Features
'Downton Abbey'

Only die-hard fans will get a chance to stay at Highclere Castle, where the show and new spin-off film were mostly shot, with interested parties required to prove they are "passionate about 'Downton Abbey.'"

Downton Abbey fans are being given a chance to live like the Crawleys, at least for one night.

Timed to the release of the new Downton Abbey movie, Highclere Castle – the 17th-century U.K. residence where much of the show is filmed – has been put on Airbnb

Posted by the Earl and Countess of Carnarvon, who own the property, the advert offers the opportunity to "live like the Lord or Lady of a stately home" and invites two guests to stay in one of the castle's 300 rooms and "be treated like royalty" during their stay. 

Included in the package are evening cocktails in the saloon, followed by a traditional dinner with the earl and countess in the state dining room, waited on by Highclere Castle’s own butler. After dinner, coffee will be served in the library before guests retire to one of the bedrooms, with an en-suite bathroom and views over 1,000 acres of rolling parkland.

The price tag for the stay isn't exactly regal, at just £120 ($149). 

However, it comes with a few catches.

Only the night of Nov. 26 is available, and those applying (after reservations start on October 1), alongside having positive reviews on Airbnb, must be passionate about Downton Abbey.

"This listing will be very popular, so to book you must have a verified Airbnb profile, positive reviews, and be passionate about Downton Abbey," the listing notes.

Despite Downton's penchant for dogs, pets aren't allowed. And Wi-Fi isn't included.

"I am passionate about the stories and heritage of Highclere Castle, and I am delighted to be able to share it with others who have a love of the building and its history," wrote Lady Carnarvon. "With the support of Airbnb, I am excited to open Highclere Castle up for a truly unique stay."

The Downton Abbey movie got off to a strong start over its opening weekend, bringing in around $12.5 million across 17 markets, including a $6.3 million (£5.1 million) bow in the U.K. and a $2 million plus take in Australia. Michael Engler directed the feature film extension of the hit period series, which ran for six seasons on ITV in the U.K. and on PBS stateside.