Emily Blunt Convinced John Krasinski to Direct 'A Quiet Place'

The hit horror film isn't Krasinski's first foray into screenwriting — he penned 2012's 'Promised Land' — but he shared a piece of advice he received from former Focus Features executive Jack Foley that helped him create the script for his 2018 success.

“I connected to the material more than anything I’ve ever connected to before because I was living it,” A Quiet Place writer and director John Krasinski told The Hollywood Reporter’s Writer Roundtable.

The spec script for A Quiet Place, which follows a family of four who must navigate their lives in total silence to avoid mysterious creatures who hunt by sound, landed in Krasinski’s hands just three weeks after welcoming his second daughter with wife and co-star Emily Blunt.

“I was living those days that anybody with kids knows, that you’re actually checking their breathing, and you’re checking to make sure they’re alive and healthy and happy and all those things. And I said, ‘If I could rewrite the script, I could bring this to be the best metaphor for parenthood,'” he said.

After pitching the idea to Blunt, calling it a “love letter to our kids,” Krasinski revealed that she was the one to say, “’You have to go direct the movie, too,’ which turned out to be a good idea, thanks to my wife,” he said.

A Quiet Place isn’t Krasinski’s first foray into screenwriting — he penned 2012's Promised Land — but he shared a piece of advice he received from former Focus Features executive Jack Foley that helped him create the script for his 2018 success.

Following a marketing meeting, “I turned to Jack and I said, ‘What’s the biggest misconception in the movie business?’ And he didn’t even hesitate, he said, 'That audiences are stupid.' He seemed very frustrated by it, and he said, ‘Nobody wants anything delivered to them, sugarcoated on a spoon. They actually want to work. They’re frustrated that you’re not making them work.’ And without a doubt, when I was writing the script, I literally thought of that story and said, ‘All right, Jack, you better be right,’” he said.

He added: “The whole idea for it was I don’t want the audiences to be ahead of the family. The family doesn’t know what’s going on, and if you’re ahead of them, you won’t care about them. So you get this information as the characters are getting this information. It was really, really fun to do.”