European Cases of Coronavirus Exceed More Than 1 Million

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According to a tally posted Sunday on the European Center for Disease Control website, Spain had the most cases in the region with 191,726, followed by Italy, Germany, Britain and France.

The European Center for Disease Control says the continent now has more than 1 million confirmed cases and has suffered almost 100,000 deaths from the new coronavirus.

According to a tally posted Sunday on the ECDC website, Spain had the most cases in the region with 191,726, followed by Italy, Germany, Britain and France. 

It listed Italy as having encountered the most coronavirus-related deaths in Europe, with 23,227, followed by Spain, France, Britain and Belgium.

According to the tally, Europe accounts for almost half the global case load and more than half the total deaths.

Italy on Sunday registered its lowest number of deaths of people with coronavirus in a month, with the death toll rising by 433 in the past 24 hours. 

That brings the national total to 23,660, still the second-highest in the world after the U.S. The number of positives rose by just over 3,000 to 178,972 — the lowest increase in more than a month. 

Because of the lack of comprehensive testing, health authorities estimate that the number of cases and deaths have been significantly underestimated. 

Italy was the first Western country to be hit by the coronavirus, in late February. While the epidemic curve continues to plateau, authorities have begun discussions on how to ease a nationwide lockdown, which has been extended through May 3. 

Pressure on Italian hospitals continues to ease, but by just 26 beds on Sunday, with 25,033 people hospitalized and 2,635 in intensive care.

Paris has shut down part of its water system after discovering trace amounts of the virus in water used for cleaning streets and watering public gardens.

City Hall said Sunday in a statement that Paris drinking water remains safe.

A municipal water management laboratory discovered “tiny traces” of the virus at four of 27 sampling points in the city’s network for non-drinking water, the statement said. That network is distinct from the city’s potable water system.

After the discovery, the city suspended use of the non-drinking water network for public places and is using the potable water system instead.

The non-drinking water is pumped in from the Seine River and an adjacent canal, and is used for street cleaning, watering parks and in some city fountains. All Paris parks, gardens and fountains are closed to the public as part of France’s anti-virus lockdown.