Co-Founder of Facebook-Owned WhatsApp Calls for Facebook Boycott

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"It is time. #deletefacebook," Brian Acton, whose messaging app was purchased by Facebook in 2014, tweeted on Tuesday evening.

Brian Acton, the co-founder of messenger application WhatsApp, called for followers to delete Facebook in a tweet on Tuesday evening.

"It is time. #deletefacebook," Acton wrote. The tweet comes on the heels of an undercover investigation broadcast on the U.K.’s Channel 4 News Senior of Cambridge Analytica — the U.K. data company at the heart of a major international scandal into the mining of data from 50 million Facebook users in order to influence elections — in which execs were caught discussing its secretive and pivotal involvement in Donald Trump’s election win.

Facebook acquired WhatsApp in 2014 for $19 billion. In September of last year, Acton left the company to start the Signal Foundation. WhatsApp co-founder, Jan Koum, continues to run the company and sits on Facebook's board.

Acton is not the first to call for a boycott of Facebook over the election scandal, as actor Jim Carrey publicly announced he would be dumping his stock in the company and deleting his personal account in February, stating, "We must encourage more oversight by the owners of these social media platforms."

Earlier on Tuesday, the New York and Massachusetts attorney generals announced an investigation into Facebook over the Cambridge Analytica scandal. “Consumers have a right to know how their information is used — and companies like Facebook have a fundamental responsibility to protect their users’ personal information," wrote New York attorney general Eric T. Schneiderman. "Today, along with Massachusetts Attorney General Healey, we sent a demand letter to Facebook — the first step in our joint investigation to get to the bottom of what happened. New Yorkers deserve answers, and if any company or individual violated the law, we will hold them accountable.”

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg has yet to comment about on the current Cambridge Analytica scandal.