ICM Joins Effort to Make Election Day a Paid Holiday

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A voting booth during the Kentucky primary election on June 23 in Louisville.

The agency is the latest to promote a voting drive that has gained traction in recent years.

ICM Partners is the latest firm to join an effort to make this year's presidential election date, Nov. 3, a paid holiday.

The agency will allow staffers to take time off to vote and the politics division of the Hollywood company will distribute voting information to employees. 

"During the last presidential election, 100 million+ voting-eligible Americans did not vote and 35% of nonvoters say that scheduling conflicts with work or school kept them from getting to the polls," ICM CEO Chris Silbermann wrote in a companywide memo on Tuesday.

Silbermann added: "In addition to paid time off on Election Day, our ICM Politics department will once again distribute company-wide voter information to ensure that all our employees have the education and information they need to vote, including registration information and relevant deadlines."

The move by companies to allow employees paid time off — or at least flexibility on schedules to vote in person on Election Day — has gained traction in recent years.

In 2018, a coalition of several hundred companies — including Levi Strauss & Co., Patagonia and Walmart — launched an effort called Time to Vote to secure pledges on the issue. Comedy Central, Paramount Network, Participant Media, Smithsonian Channel, TV Land, VH1 are currently listed as members of Time to Vote. 

This year, on June 23, Twitter leadership shared with staff that the social media giant would allow all employees to take paid time off for national election days going forward. 

ICM Partners' politics division, led Hannah Linkenhoker, is a partner with former first lady Michelle Obama's nonprofit When We All Vote, which works to increase participation in elections.

In the July 2 memo, ICM exec Silbermann noted: "We strongly believe that no one should have to choose between their paycheck and their right to vote and encourage every employee to take the time to cast their ballot this November, either in person or by mail."