Indonesia’s Falcon Pictures Joins Lionsgate's Globalgate Consortium

Courtesy of Lionsgate
Paul Presburger, William Pfeiffer, Clifford Werber

As Asia cheers the Oscar wins for 'Parasite,' the Indonesian studio becomes the 14th partner for Lionsgate's local-film remake venture led by Paul Presburger, William Pfeiffer and Clifford Werber.

As Asian cinema's global reach is spotlighted by Parasite's Oscar wins, Lionsgate's local-film remake consortium Globalgate on Tuesday said Indonesia's Falcon Pictures had joined its worldwide network.

H.B. Naveen's Falcon Pictures, which produces eight to 10 film titles every year, becomes the 14th partner for the studio's production and distribution network, which includes Televisa, TF1, Nordisk, Rai, Belga and Viva Communications. Globalgate, set up by Paul Presburger, William Pfeiffer and Clifford Werber, aims to exploit the boom in local-language features worldwide by remaking local hits, mainly for international markets.

Globalgate points to Indonesia as a fast-growing moviegoing market, with its number of cinema screens doubling to around 2000 since 2016, when restrictions on foreign investment were lifted.

“Indonesia has a thriving media industry with rapid growth in local film and series production, new cinemas, and local box office market share, and Falcon Pictures, with its unparalleled rate of growth, is firmly at its epicentre," Pfeiffer, executive chairman and co-founder of Globalgate, said in a statement.

Globalgate currently has a development slate of over 40 films and series, among them remakes of Pantelion/Televisa’s Mexican hit Instructions Not Included for the Indian and Korea markets; the Argentine rom-com No Kids, which the company is redoing for Germany, Korea and Mexico; and Terror Live, a action thriller from Lotte studios in Korea, which has Japanese and Indian remakes in the works.

Parasite swept the Academy Awards on Sunday night as it picked up trophies for best original screenplay, best international feature film, best director for Bong Joon Ho and made history as the first non-English language movie to take the best picture Oscar.