Jamie Lee Curtis Apologizes for "Snap Judgment" Over Interaction Between Native American Elder and Students

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Jamie Lee Curtis

The actress was criticized by those who felt she was right in her first reaction to the situation and were disappointed she walked it back.

Jamie Lee Curtis has apologized for what she called a "snap judgment" over footage of an interaction with a Native American elder and high school students sporting MAGA hats in D.C. over the weekend. 

“There are two sides to every story,” the actress tweeted on Sunday. With her post, she included a screenshot of a statement from Covington Catholic High School junior Nick Sandmann, who denied that he and fellow students instigated or taunted a group of Native American activists, which included elder and veteran Nathan Phillips.

“I made a snap judgment based on a photograph & I know better than to judge a book by its cover," Curtis wrote. "I wasn’t there. I shouldn’t have commented. I’m glad there wasn’t violence. I hope theses [sic] two men can meet and find common ground as can WE ALL.”

The actress was criticized by those who felt she was right in her first reaction to the situation and were disappointed she walked it back.

A number of different videos from what appeared to be a face-off between the students and Phillips have since been released. The initial video that went viral showed Phillips playing a drum and chanting while he stood in front of the smiling Sandmann, who is wearing a red MAGA hat. Other students (also wearing MAGA hats) in the background, appear to be mocking Phillips, who was taking part in the Indigenous Peoples March. The Covington Catholic High School students were on a field trip for the March for Life rally. 

Sandmann, who just smiles in the video but makes no other movements, said in a statement he did nothing wrong and was being vilified in the press.

Another video taken before the supposed face-off shows Phillips approaching the students, not the other way around. 

“I never interacted with this protestor,” Sandmann wrote in his statement. “I did not speak to him. I did not make any hand gestures or other aggressive moves. To be honest, I was startled and confused as to why he had approached me.”

Phillips told People that Sandmann blocked his way as he walked in prayer toward the Lincoln Memorial.