Julian Assange Extradition Hearing Adjourned Until May 30

Julian Assange gestures to the media from a police vehicle on his arrival at Westminster Magistrates court on April 11, 2019 - Getty-H 2019
Jack Taylor/Getty Images

Julian Assange gestures to the media from a police vehicle on his arrival at Westminster Magistrates court on April 11, 2019 in London, England.  After weeks of speculation Wikileaks founder Julian Assange was arrested by Scotland Yard Police Officers inside the Ecuadorian Embassy in Central London this morning. Ecuador's President, Lenin Moreno, withdrew Assange's Asylum after seven years citing repeated violations to international conventions. 

A procedural hearing is set for May 30, with a more substantive hearing planned for June 12 after the WikiLeaks founder said via a video link from a U.K. prison that he didn't want to be extradited.

A London hearing on Thursday about the potential extradition of WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange to the U.S. was adjourned until May 30.

The news came a day after Assange was sentenced to 50 weeks in prison. He is facing U.S. federal conspiracy charges linked to WikiLeaks and up to five years in prison if convicted. 

In London's Southwark Crown Court on Wednesday, the Australian was found guilty of breaking the Bail Act following his arrest at the Ecuadorian embassy last month. Assange had spent seven years inside the embassy, first entering in 2012 to avoid extradition to Sweden over sexual assault allegations and fears he would face trial in the U.S. He denied the allegations. 

Reuters reported that Assange, via a video link from a U.K. prison, said he did not want to surrender to extradition. It added that a procedural hearing in the extradition was now set for May 30, with a more substantive hearing planned for June 12.

Assange on Wednesday read a letter that said he had found himself "struggling with difficult circumstances" and apologized to those who "consider I've disrespected them." He added that his decision to escape bail in 2012 was made because he thought it was "the best, or perhaps the only, thing I could have done."