Kanye West Presidential Bid Seemingly Ends 10 Days After Announcement

The musician's eleventh-hour White House attempt meant he had little to no time to gather enough signatures to appear on state ballots.

Construction on Kanye West's road to the White House has shut down.

Ten days after the musician and clothing designer tweeted that he was running in the 2020 election, the effort seems to have quietly ceased. 

"He's out," adviser Steve Kramer — hired to get West on the ballot by gathering signatures in two key states: Florida and South Carolina — told New York Magazine's "The Intelligencer" on Tuesday. "I'll let you know what I know once I get all our stuff canceled."

West has yet to confirm or deny the report. 

The billionaire made global headlines when he tweeted July 4 that he would run for president in November. His announcement was questioned and even mocked as a publicity stunt for his brand, but the actor told Forbes days later he was serious. He also said he was officially done with President Donald Trump, of whom he has been a die-hard supporter for years. 

"I am taking the red hat off, with this interview," West told Forbes. "One of the main reasons I wore the red hat as a protest to the segregation of votes in the Black community. Also, other than the fact that I like Trump hotels and the saxophones in the lobby." That said, West did tell GQ in April he still supported Trump and planned on voting for the president when he cast his ballot for the first time ever in November. 

West's eleventh-hour White House bid meant he had little to no time to gather enough signatures to file with the Federal Election Commission to appear on any state ballot.

"I have nothing good or bad to say about Kanye," Kramer said. "Everyone has their personal decision about why they make decisions. Running for president has to be one of the hardest things for someone to actually contemplate at that level."

West had chosen as his running mate Michelle Tidball, an obscure preacher from Wyoming, and said his White House organizational model would be based on the fictitious Marvel secret country of Wakanda from Black Panther. "I'm gonna use the framework of Wakanda right now because it's the best explanation of what our design group is going to feel like in the White House," West told Forbes.