Magnolia Pictures, Ben & Jerry's, Eddie Bauer and More Brands Join Facebook Ad Boycott

Courtesy of REUTERS/ Leah Millis
Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg

Magnolia became the first Hollywood company to join the growing "#StopHateforProfit" campaign.

Hollywood studio Magnolia Pictures, ice cream maker Ben & Jerry's and sporting equipment giant Eddie Bauer are the latest companies to announce that they will join a growing advertising boycott of Facebook and Instagram for the month of July over the social media giant's failure to stop the spread of misinformation and dangerous content on its platforms. 

On Tuesday, Magnolia became the first Hollywood company to join the boycott. The company, which distributed I Am Not Your Negro and Shoplifters, tweeted, "In solidarity with the #StopHateForProfit movement, Magnolia Pictures has chosen to stop advertising on Facebook and Instagram, starting immediately, through at least the end of July. We are seeking meaningful change at Facebook and the end to their amplification of hate speech." 

In a statement posted to its website, Ben & Jerry's said, "As of July 1st we will pause all paid advertising on Facebook and Instagram in the United States as part of the #StopHateForProfit campaign," it added. "We call on Facebook, Inc. to take the clear and unequivocal actions called for by the campaign to stop its platform from being used to spread and amplify racism and hate."

Last Wednesday, a group that included the Anti-Defamation League, the NAACP, Sleeping Giants, Color of Change, Free Press and Common Sense launched the #StopHateForProfit social media campaign that called on companies to suspend advertising on Facebook and its subsidiary Instagram for the month of July. 

In recent days, outdoor clothing firms Patagonia, The North Face and Arc'teryx, outdoor equipment company REI, tech companies Dashlane and Upwork have all said they will join the boycott.

Facebook has faced fierce criticism, externally and internally, in recent months for the misinformation and racist content spread on its platform, and in particular posts from President Donald Trump that have been widely condemned as dangerous or inciting violence. The company's CEO Mark Zuckerberg has remained firm that Facebook will not regulate online speech. "I just believe strongly that Facebook shouldn't be the arbiter of truth of everything that people say online," Zuckerberg said in an interview with Fox News last month. "Private companies probably shouldn't be, especially these platform companies, shouldn't be in the position of doing that."