Mayor Eric Garcetti Talks Climate Change at 'Paris to Pittsburgh' Premiere

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From left: David Andrade, Zero Hour co-founder Jamie Margolin, Mayor of Los Angeles Eric Garcetti, LA chief sustainability officer Lauren Faber O'Connor and producer Lindsay Firestone

The film follows the efforts made by local communities in battling the threat of climate change.

Los Angeles mayor Eric Garcetti knows that climate change has impacted his city in catastrophic ways.

"We experienced a fire the size of Denver that destroyed over a billion and a half dollars worth of homes and killed people," he told The Hollywood Reporter before the Los Angeles premiere of documentary Paris to Pittsburgh at the Museum of Contemporary Art. "We have communities of color and low-income communities near the port of L.A. that have cancer and asthma rates that are higher than other places."

The film, narrated by The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel's Rachel Brosnahan, was produced by RadicalMedia in partnership with Bloomberg Philanthropies. It follows the efforts made by local communities in battling the threat of climate change, set after the Trump administration announced in 2017 that the U.S. would withdraw from the Paris Climate Agreement. Phenomena such as the sea-level rise in Orlando, Fla. and the wildfires in Ventura, Calif. are among the issues featured.

The documentary also details the career options that have become available in renewable energy industries. Mayor Garcetti spoke about the tangibility of climate change as well as the opportunities it opens up for societies.

"This is the biggest crisis of our lives and it's the most direct threat to our human health," Garcetti said. "And it's also, on a positive note, about jobs, it's about development, it's about how we can find a new paradigm to have healthy lives, healthy economies and healthy communities."

Paris to Pittsburgh producer Lindsay Firestone spoke with THR about the inspiration for the film's title: "When Trump pulled out of the Paris agreement, he said in his address to the country that he was here to represent the citizens of Pittsburgh, not Paris, which is obviously kind of a funny disconnect — the Paris Agreement is not about the citizens of Paris."

After the screening, The Affair star Joshua Jackson moderated a panel that included Firestone and three of the film's subjects: chief sustainability officer Lauren Faber O'Connor, Jamie Margolin, founder of youth-led environmental justice movement Zero Hour, and David Andrade, a Los Angeles community member who was formerly incarcerated and is now a coordinator for solar panel installations for Homeboy Industries.

Paris to Pittsburgh will screen in six other cities including New York, Orlando and Minneapolis and will broadcast worldwide Dec. 12 on National Geographic.