Mos Def, A$AP Rocky, Christian Combs and Others Attend Rick Owens' Smoke-Filled Paris Show

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Featuring 'Battlestar Galactica' motifs and huge cherry bomb fireworks.

Rick Owens isn’t one to join the crowd — except when it comes to a front row. Following suit with many of the other designers here at Paris Men's Fashion Week, he filled the prime seating with the rap and hip-hop community: Mos Def, A$AP Rocky, Christian Combs, Quincy Brown and Kareem Biggs among others. Owens' wife Michele Lamy, the woman so cool it’s scary, entertained the group pre-show.

Combs, who has starred in both Tommy Hilfiger and Dolce & Gabbana campaigns, was wearing a New York City designer by the name of Murder Bravado and attending his second Rick Owens show. “It’s definitely a better vibe than in January. Really looking forward to this, because last time I was late, and I didn’t get to see it all.” The famous offspring of Sean Combs will be back in the States and at work in a few days, busy with the drop of his new video for his "Love U Better" song, a collaboration with Chris Brown and releasing his first mix tape called 90’s Baby.

For Brown, Combs' half-brother, the show was a first. In a head-to-toe look by up-and-coming French designer Sadak, Brown could not contain his enthusiasm about Paris.

“I’m blown away. Every show comes with its own new world as if you aren’t in Paris anymore. But that’s what designers do, they push the envelope.” Along with his regular appearance on the show Star, Brown just released two songs: "Snuggle Up” and “Your Crazy I’m Fine."  He’s also working on a Netflix Christmas film where he stars alongside Kat Graham.

Boy, was he in for a treat. Owens showed outside in the plaza of his preferred Palais de Tokyo location. That in itself was a general indication that one of the five elements would come into play in a major way. Guests were advised to use the face-masks that served as the invitation, with the “protection civille” agents there “in case.” A handful of metal vitrines flanked the elevated runway that sliced through the plaza’s now-empty fountain that were ignited to revealed massive splays of colored smoke, first blue, yellow, pink and finally green. Just imagine nuclear-sized cherry bombs fireworks.

Some guests had better views than others. For those who missed it, it went something like this: a lineup of pretty wearables slashed and tied this way and T-shirts paired with baggy, wide-legged pants or shorts that more often than not had sewn-on waist treatments that resembled a jacket tied around the waist or an overall top dangling. Miscellaneous strings and straps flowed in the wind.

Next came out the Battlestar Galactica get-ups — garnering a guess on that, as Owens only allowed certain pubs any insight on his inspiration. The prism-shaped drawing on the invite came to life on long, tunic-style coats encrusted like armor with plastic geometric slices. These were often worn with nylon mesh masks that had massive, floor-length fringe made from plastic shards.

The last group Owens showed was typical Rick Owens in that it explored his favorite theme of protection. He fashioned a series of nylon tent structures to be worn on the body, some completely covered and others where the nylon was ripped off the plastic framing to expose the body underneath. Exposure may prove to be a new thing for Owens as one guest quipped leaving the show, “I think we were all just exposed to cancerous gas.” Anything for the love of fashion.