Rose McGowan to Tony Robbins: "We Suffer Because of Men Like You"

"We — I'm fairly sure I can speak for 'we' — don't want your apology," said the actress and advocate.

Rose McGowan is in no way satisfied with the recent apology Tony Robbins offered after a video of him criticizing the #MeToo movement went viral. 

In a recent interview with NowThis, the actress and outspoken advocate called Robbins' career "bullshit," and criticized him for using his power to seemingly bully one of the attendees of a recent seminar. 

"I would submit, sir, that you are a falsehood," McGowan said. "I would submit, sir, that your work is based on a falsehood."

The life coach and self-help guru over the weekend issued an apology for remarks he made during one of his self-help lectures in San Jose, California, where he seemed to criticize some of the women who have joined the #MeToo movement, saying, essentially, some victims of sexual abuse do not take responsibility for themselves.

McGowan, who has been one of the loudest voices in the #MeToo movement following the downfall of Harvey Weinstein, weighed in on Robbins.

"We — I'm fairly sure I can speak for 'we' — don't want your apology," she said. "We want change. We want your mind to not be like that. We want you not to be narrow and square. We suffer because of men like you."

Watching the viral video, featuring both Robbins' comments and the moment when he was confronted by a woman in the crowd by the name of Nanine McCool, made McGowan emotional. 

"It makes my heart race," she said. "It's very triggering, actually. And I am sure a lot of women were triggered by watching that. And that's what that kind of abuse of power does."

Continued McGowan: "I'm like, that man is a bully and he is abusing his power. There is something called 'imposter syndrome,' and I think men overall suffer from this. It is not necessarily their fault. Before they even had boots on the ground, they were told they were better."

Still, McGowan believes if the two actually spoke, it would make a difference. 

"I think if I sat down in a room with him for a few hours, I could get a 10 percent shift — and he wouldn't even have to pay me," she said. 

McGowan closed by encouraging more women to stand up, like McCool. 

"Because when someone pushes you, all we have is truth," she said. "What have you got to lose? What have they not already done to you? What more are they going to do?"