Grave for 'South Park's' Kenny McCormick Used to Promote Housing Complex in Russia

Comedy Central/YouTube
'South Park'

It appeared in the central Russian city of Kazan at a residential project also named South Park.

A grave for South Park character Kenny McCormick appeared at a housing project in central Russia, apparently as a promotional stunt for the project, which is also named South Park.

The fake gravestone installed at the entrance to the residential complex in Kazan read, "Kenny McCormick. 19??-2019. Sleep well, little child, the Lord holds thee now."

The residential complex's developer, a company named Suvarstroit, denied it was behind the symbolic grave but played along.

"We assure you, this character is not just alive, but also bought an apartment in the building, taking advantage of our special offer," Suvarstroit said on its account on Vkontakte, the local equivalent of Facebook.

Paramount Comedy, which airs the series in Russia, declined to comment.

Local media reported that the fake grave was most likely a publicity stunt by the developer in an attempt to capitalize on the popularity of the South Park series in Russia.

Russian social media users were divided on the stunt. While some appreciated the joke, others said whoever came up with the idea went a bit too far. A number of Twitter users commented on the situation using the famous phrase uttered in South Park every time the Kenny character dies: "Oh my God, they killed Kenny!"

South Park has aired in Russia since 2000. In 2008, the network 2x2, which aired the series at the time, faced the revoking of its license as some episodes were investigated for alleged "extremism," but the probe went nowhere.