Los Angeles Extends Countywide Curfew

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Cities such as Santa Monica, Beverly Hills and more have set citywide curfews after looting and violence in many areas followed protests over the weekend.

Los Angeles County will continue to impose curfews Tuesday after looting and violence in many areas following protests over the weekend with cities such as Santa Monica, Beverly Hills and Culver City having set curfews. 

The county announced Tuesday that it would be under a countywide curfew from 6 p.m. that night to 6 a.m. on Wednesday. Meanwhile, Beverly Hills is sticking with its 1 p.m. curfew on Tuesday, which will last until 5:30 a.m. on Wednesday. Santa Monica, which also imposed a stricter curfew Monday, on Tuesday set a curfew from 2 p.m. Tuesday afternoon until 5:30 a.m. on Wednesday.

Culver City will stick with its 4 p.m.-5:30 a.m. curfew from Tuesday night through Wednesday morning. Burbank is continuing its curfew from 5 p.m. Tuesday night until 6 a.m. Wednesday. Glendale, which on Monday was under a 5 p.m.-6 a.m. curfew, is following the L.A. County restrictions, as are Long Beach and Torrance.

On Monday, Santa Monica and Beverly Hills' curfews went into effect at 1 p.m. for their business districts and 4 p.m. citywide. The Beverly Hills City Business District curfew included the Business Triangle (including Rodeo Drive), South Beverly Drive, Roberson Boulevard and La Cienega Boulevard.

Culver City also declared a curfew beginning at 4 p.m. Monday and extending to Tuesday at 5:30 a.m. On Monday, the city of Long Beach declared a curfew starting at 1 p.m. in business districts and imposed it citywide from 4 p.m. Monday to 5 a.m. Tuesday. Torrance also had a curfew set for 6 p.m. Monday night into 6 a.m. Tuesday. Burbank had a set curfew until 6 a.m. Tuesday.

Residents are advised to remain in their homes during these hours.

The protests, which began last week in Minneapolis following George Floyd's death after a police officer pressed a knee on his neck until he stopped breathing, have left parts of the city a grid of broken windows, burned-out buildings and ransacked stores. The unrest has since become a national phenomenon as protesters decry years of deaths at the hands of police.

In response, Los Angeles County had first enacted a countywide curfew Sunday. As looting and violence increased over the weekend, Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti enlisted help from the National Guard. Gov. Gavin Newsom also declared a state of emergency, resulting in about 1,000 National Guard personnel being deployed Saturday night. 

More than 100 troops were brought in to Santa Monica on Sunday night to help get the crowds to disperse, according to Santa Monica Police Chief Cynthia Renaud. They remained in the city Monday to patrol. 

Renaud said in a news conference Monday that more than 400 people were arrested Sunday on various charges, including burglary, looting and assault with a deadly weapon. She said 95 percent of the suspects were not residents of Santa Monica. 

Beverly Hills experienced looting and fires in its Fairfax District on Saturday, while Santa Monica's Third Street Promenade was also hit by looters. "In the midst of national chaos, the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors proclaimed the existence of a local emergency: Civil unrest," read a statement announcing the curfew.

"The effects of public calamity caused disaster and extreme peril to the safety of people and property. Because of the dangers which often occur under cover of darkness and the difficulty to preserve public safety during these hours, a curfew was ordered, as allowed by Government Code Section 8634. At the direction of Sheriff Alex Villanueva, and until further notification, a county-wide curfew was imposed."

June 2, 11:39 a.m. This story has been updated with Tuesday's L.A. County curfew.

June 2, 12:06 p.m. This story has been updated with additional curfew information for Beverly Hills, Santa Monica, Culver City and Glendale.

June 2, 4:27 p.m. This story has been updated with additional curfew information for Long Beach, Torrance and Burbank.

Hilary Lewis contributed to this report.