SoCal's Woolsey Fire: 435 Structures Destroyed; 96,314 Acres Burned

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Woolsey Fire burns in Malibu on Nov. 10.

Containment is at 35 percent.

The number of structures destroyed in the Woolsey Fire increased to more than 400, officials said Tuesday morning.

The fire, which began around 2:30 p.m. Thursday, has burned 96,314 acres and approximately 435 structures have been destroyed. Two have been damaged, officials said. Containment is at 35 percent. 

Mandatory evacuation orders remain in effect for Malibu and the communities of West Hills, Monte Nido, Gated Oaks and Topanga. Repopulation began Sunday night for Agoura Hills and Westlake Village residents. Full repopulation for Hidden Hills began Tuesday. Calabasas will have limited areas reopen Tuesday. 

The many structures that have burned in the fire include vineyards, historical sites and homes, including residences of those in the industry such as actor Gerard Butler, director Scott Derrickson and musician Miley Cyrus.

More than 250,000 people have been displaced in evacuations. 

Treacherous winds have helped the fire spread faster than any previous blaze, officials noted. 

"This is the most destructive and devastating fire that I've witnessed since the 1993 fires," Malibu City Councilman Skylar Peak noted Saturday.

On the ground, 3,592 firefighters are battling the blaze. Three have been injured. In the air, 22 helicopters are engaged. 

Two civilian deaths have been linked to the fire. Authorities are still investigating the cases. 

The state enacted the Emergency Management Assistance Compact to request assistance from other states.

Gov. Jerry Brown on Sunday requested a Presidential Major Disaster Declaration to bolster the ongoing emergency response to the major fires burning in Butte, Los Angeles and Ventura counties.

"We have the best firefighters and first responders in the country working in some of the most difficult conditions imaginable," Brown said in a statement. "We’re putting everything we’ve got into the fight against these fires and this request ensures communities on the front lines get additional federal aid."

President Donald Trump has yo-yoed between blaming California for the fires and then praising the crews putting their lives at risk fighting the infernos.