'The Talk' Co-Hosts Support Gayle King's Call for Transparency in Moonves Probe

"Every other person who's a powerful CEO of a public company can do the same thing if it happens again," Sharon Osbourne said. "How are women ever going to feel comfortable in the workplace if they still think that power and money will be held over their heads? … It's never going to end."

Julie Chen continued her absence from The Talk on Tuesday, but that didn't stop her co-hosts on the CBS daytime show from continuing to discuss the news surrounding former CBS CEO Les Moonves, who resigned Sunday night after facing multiple sexual misconduct claims.

The co-hosts, joined by Fuller House star Jodie Sweetin, all agreed with Gayle King's call for transparency Tuesday morning, in which she criticized CBS for not releasing the results of the investigation into Moonves' conduct. 

Sheryl Underwood spoke first after Sharon Osbourne recapped the news and pointed out that The Talk's studio audience "wasn't really happy" when they heard the results would be kept confidential.

"Secrecy causes more questions," Underwood said. "Transparency brings clarity. … How do we make sure this never happens again? We need to get to solutions."

Osbourne, meanwhile, indicated she was concerned about the example that would be set by a powerful former CEO of a publicly traded company keeping the results of a sexual misconduct probe private.

"I don't like it, because the situation is every other person who's a powerful CEO of a public company can do the same thing if it happens again," she said. "How are women ever going to feel comfortable in the workplace if they still think that power and money will be held over their heads? … It's never going to end. It shouldn't be allowed for anybody to have the verdict kept sealed. It's not fair to women. It will never end."

Sara Gilbert argued that transparency would help other women come forward and said both sides should want the truth to come out.

"I feel like it would be difficult to work at a company feeling like things aren't going to be told, if things go wrong or things are done that put women or anyone in a compromising position. You want to feel like it's going to become public," she said. "I also feel like these women were very brave in speaking what their truth is and so if the stories are true ... they deserve to be corroborated. Les is saying they're not true, so I would think, in equal measure, he would want the results put out."

Eve concurred: "The truth needs to be told. … Transparency helps the fear to go away. … There should be no more fear of telling your story and sharing your story, so transparency is needed."

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