USC Announces Film and TV Scripter Award Nominees

FIRST COW
Courtesy of A24

The Scripter Award and the best adapted screenplay Oscar have gone to the same project on 14 occasions over the past 32 years.

The USC Libraries has announced its finalists for the 33rd USC Scripter Awards, which celebrate scripts adapted from pre-existing literary material, will take place virtually this year on Saturday, March 13.

On the film side, the nominees include best adapted screenplay Oscar frontrunners Ma Rainey's Black Bottom (Ruben Santiago Hudson's version of the late August Wilson's play of the same name), Nomadland (which Chloe Zhao derived from Jesssica Bruder's book of the same name) and One Night in Miami (Kemp Powers take on his own play of the same name) will be joined by indie darling First Cow (Kelly Reichardt, from Jon Raymond's novel The Half-Life) and TV movie Bad Education (Mike Makowsky's reinterpretation of Robert Kolker's New York magazine article "The Bad Superintendent").

The Scripter Award and the best adapted screenplay Oscar have gone to the same project on 14 occasions over the past 32 years: Schindler's List (1993), Sense and Sensibility (1995), L.A. Confidential (1997), A Beautiful Mind (2001), No Country for Old Men (2007), Slumdog Millionaire (2008), The Social Network (2010), The Descendants (2011), Argo (2012), 12 Years a Slave (2013), The Imitation Game (2014), The Big Short (2015), Moonlight (2016) and Call Me by Your Name (2017). Last year, however, the Scripter went to Little Women, while the Oscar went to Jojo Rabbit.

The TV Scripter Award was introduced in 2016. This fifth presentation of it will go to either The Good Lord Bird (for the episode "Meet the Lord," written by Mark Richard and Ethan Hawke from James McBride's novel of the same name); Normal People (the fifth episode, written by Sally Rooney and Alice Birch, from Rooney's novel); The Plot Against America (Ed Burns and David Simon's sixth episode, based on the novel by Philip Roth); The Queen's Gambit (the "Openings" episode by Scott Frank, from Walter Tevis' novel); or Unorthodox (the first episode, written by Anna Winger, from Deborah Feldman's autobiography of the same name).