Box Office: 'Jumanji' Roars to No. 1 With $36M as 'Insidious 4' Scares Off 'Last Jedi'

Courtesy of Universal Pictures
'Insidious: The Last Key'

'Star Wars: The Last Jedi' is losing steam in its fourth weekend, as well as opening to a sorely disappointing $28.7 million in China behind both 'Star Wars: The Force Awakens' and 'Rogue One: A Star Wars Story.'

Sony's holiday hit Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle was the winner for the first time at the North American box office over the weekend, rumbling to $36 million from 3,801 theaters in its third outing for a domestic total of $244.4 million.

The film also topped the foreign chart with $70 million from 86 markets for an international tally of $275 million and $519.4 million globally. Its final major market is China, where it opens next weekend.

The holiday tentpole, successfully dusting off a long-dormant property and launching a new franchise, fell a scant 27 percent from last weekend domestically.

Placing No. 2 was Insidious: The Last Key. In another win for Universal and Blumhouse, the movie scared up an estimated $29.3 million from 3,801 theaters as 2018 got underway at the box office. Sony also has a stake in the film and is handling it overseas, where it took in $20.1 million from its first 33 markets for a worldwide launch of $49.3 million.

The $10 million horror pic opened ahead of the last installment ($22.7 million), but behind the $40.3 million launch of Insidious: Chapter 2. This time, the story follows the final adventure of Lin Shaye's ghost-whispering character Elise Rainier, a parapsychologist who investigates the recent supernatural disturbances of a home she lived in when she was younger. Adam Robitel took over to direct from a script again written by Leigh Whannell. Insidious 4 earned a B- CinemaScore.

The Insidious series began with the original 2011 movie directed by James Wan and starring Patrick Wilson and Rose Byrne. Wan also helmed the 2013 sequel, and Whannell made his directorial debut with the prequel in 2015. The franchise has grossed $392 million worldwide.

Insidious 4 even beat Disney/Lucasfilm's Star Wars: The Last Jedi, which was dethroned after coming in No. 1 its first three weekends. The tentpole tumbled 54 percent in its fourth outing to $23.6 million from 4,232 theaters for a domestic tally of $572.5 million, the best showing of any 2017 release.

While The Last Jedi is certainly doing big business globally — its worldwide tally through Sunday stands at $1.205 billion — it is losing steam in comparison to Star Wars: The Force Awakens. Two years ago, The Force Awakens grossed $42.4 million in its fourth weekend in North America and didn't lose the top spot at the domestic box office until its fifth weekend. Another sore point is China, where The Last Jedi opened behind both The Force Awakens and Rogue One: A Star Wars Story with $28.7 million.

China or no China, The Last Jedi will ultimately rank as one of the top 10 biggest films of all time at the worldwide box office, not adjusted for inflation. In North America, it is already No. 6.

In its third weekend, 20th Century Fox and Chernin Entertainment's The Greatest Showman, starring Hugh Jackman, displayed vibrant staying power after performing behind expectations over the year-end holidays. The film fell 11 percent — almost unheard for a big-budget, all-audience tentpole — to $12.8 million from 3,342 theaters for $76.9 million domestically.

Greatest Showman earned another $24 million from 75 markets offshore for a foreign cume of $74.5 million and $151.4 million globally.

Universal's Pitch Perfect 3 rounded out the top five with $10.2 million from 3,458 locations for $86 million domestically and $141 milion worldwide.

Elsewhere, STX and producer Mark Gordon's Molly's Game expanded nationwide in its second weekend into a total of 1,608 theaters. The adult-skewing film earned $7 million for an early domestic tally of $14.2 million. Internationally, it pulled in $5.4 million from a handful of markets for a foreign tally of $7.6 million and $21.8 million globally.

Marking Aaron Sorkin's directorial debut, Molly's Game stars Jessica Chastain as the real-life Molly Bloom, an Olympic-class skier who ran the world's most exclusive high-stakes poker game for a decade before being arrested in the middle of the night by 17 FBI agents wielding automatic weapons. Her players included Hollywood royalty, sports stars, business titans and finally, unbeknownst to her, the Russian mob. After being arrested, her only ally was her criminal defense lawyer.

Chastain, who stars opposite Idris Elba, is up for best actress at Sunday night's Golden Globes, while Sorkin is up for best adapted screenplay. Kevin Costner, Michael Cera, Jeremy Strong, Chris O'Dowd and Bill Camp co-star in the pic.

Neon and 30West's Globe contender I, Tonya, starring Margot Robbie as figure skater Tonya Harding, also skated into additional theaters over the weekend, grossing $2.4 million from 242 locations for a location average of $10,026, on par with Lady Bird's average when flying into roughly the same number of cinemas. I, Tonya has earned $5.3 million to date.

Among other Golden Globe nominees, Steven Spielberg's The Post upped its theater count from nine cinemas to 36, posting the best theater average of the weekend with $47,222. Starring Meryl Streep and Tom Hanks, the Pentagon Papers drama boasts six Globe noms. (Additionally, the Trump White House asked to screen the movie this weekend.)

Focus Features' Phantom Thread, also a player at Sunday's Golden Globes ceremony, posted the next-best theater average with $40,833. Directed by Paul Thomas Anderson and starring Daniel Day-Lewis, the period drama is playing in six theaters. Focus also saw Darkest Hour, starring Gary Oldham as Winston Churchill, near $30 million as it moved into a total of 1,732 locations on the eve of the Globes.

Jan. 5, 1:15 p.m. Updated with weekend estimates.
Jan. 6, 8:15 a.m. Updated with Friday estimates.
Jan. 7, 7:45 a.m. Updated with weekend estimates.

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