West Hollywood, Beverly Hills Battle Over Famed Log Cabin: "It's a Landmark of Recovery"

The cities want "to determine a shared approach to the current uses" of the dilapidated structure that could mean an end to its current status, but 10,000 petition signers are trying to save a building that for decades has been home to 12-step recovery groups.
Jared Rosenthal; Tibrina Hobson/Getty Images
The Log Cabin on Robertson. (Inset: Patricia Arquette)

A battle is being waged over the Log Cabin on Robertson Boulevard.

On one side, the cities of West Hollywood and Beverly Hills, both of which have a stake in the property (built nearly a century ago, before West Hollywood existed), want "to determine a shared approach to the current uses" that could mean an end to its current status. On the other, there are 10,000-plus petition signers, as well as scores of famous Log Cabin fans, who want to save a building that for decades has been home to 12-step recovery groups.

David Arquette calls it "a hub for sobriety and support groups," while sister Patricia Arquette argues that "it's important to maintain older buildings." 

Ellen EP Andy Lassner, another champion of the site, tells The Hollywood Reporter that the Log Cabin "is not just another building in L.A. — it is a landmark of recovery."

Beverly Hills City Manager George Chavez says discussions are underway about the Log Cabin's fate: "Both cities recognize the important work that has occurred at this site and the countless lives that have been changed for the better."

This story first appeared in the Jan. 22 issue of The Hollywood Reporter magazine. Click here to subscribe.